Greetings, I'm chloe, and this blog is a work in progress okay

kqedscience:

Floating Architecture: Finding Ways to Live With Rising Water
“The Ark is a hotel by Russian design firm Remistudio and is meant to be self-sufficient. The transparent foil roof would allow light to reach plants inside, and the waste produced in the building would be converted into fuel. The cupola form is meant to be energy-efficient, and its shell basement with cables and arches is designed to distribute weight evenly to make it earthquake- and flood-resistant. ”

kqedscience:

Floating Architecture: Finding Ways to Live With Rising Water

“The Ark is a hotel by Russian design firm Remistudio and is meant to be self-sufficient. The transparent foil roof would allow light to reach plants inside, and the waste produced in the building would be converted into fuel. The cupola form is meant to be energy-efficient, and its shell basement with cables and arches is designed to distribute weight evenly to make it earthquake- and flood-resistant. ”

ikenbot:

Look Out: Venus Transit

On June 5, 2012, Venus will pass across the face of the sun, producing a silhouette that no one alive today will likely see again.

Transits of Venus are very rare, coming in pairs separated by more than a hundred years. This June’s transit, the bookend of a 2004-2012 pair, won’t be repeated until the year 2117. Fortunately, the event is widely visible. Observers on seven continents, even a sliver of Antarctica, will be in position to see it.

ikenbot:

Look Out: Venus Transit

On June 5, 2012, Venus will pass across the face of the sun, producing a silhouette that no one alive today will likely see again.

Transits of Venus are very rare, coming in pairs separated by more than a hundred years. This June’s transit, the bookend of a 2004-2012 pair, won’t be repeated until the year 2117. Fortunately, the event is widely visible. Observers on seven continents, even a sliver of Antarctica, will be in position to see it.

ikenbot:

GALEX presents The Andromeda Galaxy

A mere 2.5 million light-years away, the Andromeda Galaxy really is just next door as large galaxy’s go.

So close, and spanning some 260,000 light-years, it took 11 different image fields from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) satellite’s telescope to produce this gorgeous portrait of the spiral galaxy in ultraviolet light.

While its spiral arms stand out in visible light images of Andromeda (also known as M31), the arms look more like rings in the GALEX ultraviolet view, dominated by hot, young, massive stars.

As sites of intense star formation, the rings have been interpreted has evidence Andromeda collided with its smaller neighboring elliptical galaxy M32 more than 200 million years ago. The large Andromeda galaxy and our own Milky Way are the dominant members of the local galaxy group.

ikenbot:

GALEX presents The Andromeda Galaxy

A mere 2.5 million light-years away, the Andromeda Galaxy really is just next door as large galaxy’s go.

So close, and spanning some 260,000 light-years, it took 11 different image fields from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) satellite’s telescope to produce this gorgeous portrait of the spiral galaxy in ultraviolet light.

While its spiral arms stand out in visible light images of Andromeda (also known as M31), the arms look more like rings in the GALEX ultraviolet view, dominated by hot, young, massive stars.

As sites of intense star formation, the rings have been interpreted has evidence Andromeda collided with its smaller neighboring elliptical galaxy M32 more than 200 million years ago. The large Andromeda galaxy and our own Milky Way are the dominant members of the local galaxy group.

ikenbot:

10 Years of Aqua Satellite’s Incredible Images of Earth From Space

The view of Earth from space has transformed our understanding of, as well as our admiration for, the planet. The data and images collected by Earth-observing satellites have been used in thousands of scientific papers, helped us better respond to natural disasters, improved weather and climate forecasts, enlightened us about our impact on Earth and captivated us with beauty.

One of the stars of NASA’s fleet of satellites is Aqua. The satellite is named for its ability to measure water vapor in the atmosphere, water in the oceans, as well as ice and snow. When it was launched on May 4, 2002, scientists expected it to work for three to five years. But its six instruments have been functioning perfectly for 10 years, gathering 29 million gigabytes of data in that time.

One of the most useful and impressive instruments aboard Aqua is the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, which measures visible and infrared radiation, and produces truly amazing, incredibly beautiful images of Earth. We’ve chosen some of our favorite MODIS images for this gallery in celebration of a decade of work. With funding for Earth-observing satellites on the decline, let’s hope Aqua keeps going for 10 more years.

Click to View Full Gallery